Community News

Bald eagles and ospreys rebound in New Jersey
3/16/2017 Volume XLVII, No. 11

Not long ago, bald eagles and ospreys were a rare sight in this state we’re in. But they’re back – in a big way!

Two new state reports just delivered the excellent news that bald eagle and osprey populations have reached record highs in New Jersey and are expected to continue their remarkable recovery!

According to the Endangered and Nongame Species Program of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, surveys conducted in 2016 documented 172 nesting or territorial pairs of bald eagles, up from 161 the year before; and 515 nesting pairs of ospreys, up from 472 the previous year.

Forty to fifty years ago, the prognosis for bald eagles and ospreys in the Garden State was dire, mostly due to pesticides.

The once widely used pesticide DDT contained a toxin that caused bird eggs to become brittle and break in the nest. DDT entered the food chain when pesticides washed into waterways and were absorbed by aquatic plants and fish. Birds like bald eagles and ospreys - also known as “fish hawks” - ingested the DDT toxin by eating contaminated fish. Populations plummeted after years of nest failures.

Bald eagles, our national symbol, were especially impacted. In 1967, the Secretary of Interior listed bald eagles south of the 40th parallel as endangered under the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966.

In 1972 – a decade after Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring documented damage coinciding with the use of DDT – the pesticide was banned for agricultural use in the United States. The following year, the U.S. Endangered Species Act was adopted, increasing protections for bald eagles.

But eagles were slow to rebound. In 1982, there was only one bald eagle nest left in New Jersey, and it repeatedly failed due to the lingering effects of DDT. The state brought in eagles from Canada to rebuild New Jersey's population.

Since then, both in New Jersey and across the nation, bald eagles staged an amazing recovery. In 2007, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service removed bald eagles from the federal list of endangered and threatened species.

Breeding bald eagle populations in New Jersey are still listed as endangered by the state; and breeding osprey populations are listed as threatened. On the federal level, both species are still protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

According to New Jersey’s 2016 bald eagle project report, 150 “active” nests – that is, those with eggs – produced 216 young. Eaglets from 11 nests were banded for future tracking. Eagles are now found in every New Jersey county, but the Delaware Bay region remains the stronghold, with 47 percent of eagle nests located in Cumberland and Salem counties and on the bay side of Cape May County.

“The state’s eagle population would not be thriving without the efforts of the dedicated eagle volunteers who observe nests, report sightings, and help protect critical habitat,” noted the report.

According to the 2016 osprey report, a total of 515 active osprey nests were found. From those nests with known outcomes, a total of 670 young were produced, of which 361 were banded for future tracking.

“In our densely populated state, especially along the coast, nesting ospreys are now present in almost every coastal township from Sandy Hook to Cape May,” the report said. “To help ensure their long term survival, we must continue to protect nest sites while dealing with nests built in dangerous locations to protect the loss of individual birds and damage to property.”

If you’d like to learn more about bald eagles and ospreys, you can watch them on their nests through video cameras set up in strategic locations.

Duke Farms in Somerset County installed its “Eagle Cam” in 2008 to monitor the nest of a pair of bald eagles. The nest was destroyed during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but the eagles rebuilt it the following year in a nearby tree. The pair returned to Duke Farms earlier this year but they have not laid eggs yet. To get a bird’s eye view of the nest, go to http://dukefarms.org/eaglecam.

Island Beach State Park has about 30 nesting pairs of ospreys, and the Friends of Island Beach State Park have set up an “Osprey Cam” over one of the nests, occupied last year by a couple named Bay and Bandit. To watch this nest, go to http://friendsofibsp.org/osprey-cam/.

Enjoy these beautiful birds, and be thankful there are laws to protect them and volunteers to assist in their recovery.

One additional way to protect these birds – and other endangered and threatened wildlife - is through a checkoff box on the New Jersey income tax form. By checking Line 59 of Form NJ-1040, taxpayers have the option of contributing toward the protection of threatened and endangered species.

To read the bald eagle report, go to http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/ensp/pdf/eglrpt16.pdf. To read the osprey report, go to http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/ensp/pdf/osprey16.pdf. If you’re interested in volunteering to monitor nests, contact the Conserve Wildlife Foundation – which supports the Endangered and Nongame Species Program – at 609-984-6012 or http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/contact/.

And to learn more about preserving New Jersey’s land and natural resources, visit the New Jersey Conservation Foundation website at www.njconservation.org or contact me at info@njconservation.org.  

POSTS

Vernal pools: Now you see 'em, now you don't

State targets illegal dumpers in parks and forests

Former governors and elected leaders stand up for environment

Join CSAs to support local farms, save money, eat better

Weather extremes may be New Jersey's new normal

Bald eagles and ospreys rebound in New Jersey

Pine Barrens prescribed fires: A renewal force

Take a walk on the bottom of the sea!

Energy efficiency saves money and land - and creates jobs!

The Pines of March

Trees are more social than you think!

New Jersey's geological 'layer cake'

Keeping the 'great' in Paterson's Great Falls

Some good news!

Take action to defend and protect land and water

Interested in ecology? Become a Rutgers Environmental Steward

2016 wins and losses for New Jersey's land and water

Kick off a healthy New Year with First Day hike

Energy infrastructure: the new sprawl

Two great books for connecting kids with nature

Why do some trees stay green while others lose their leaves?

Melting ice, rising seas, hotter planet

Our forests never sleep, even in winter!

Documentary brings Great Swamp battle back to life

Defending the land they loved

Four years after Sandy, rising sea levels predicted

New Jersey: Small state, big diversity

10 great natural areas for enjoying fall colors

Removing obsolete dams brings rivers back to life

Humpback whales a welcome sight off NJ coast

NJ wine industry boosts agritourism

For good health, bathe in a forest!

Let's NOT make a deal!

New Jersey's spectacular waterfalls

Urban trees boost health and land values

Blue Acres: A win-win for open space, owners of flooded homes

Get mosquitos to buzz off - naturally!

Flawed pipeline approval process needs reforms

Speak out for our Atlantic Ocean and coast!

Help Pokemon Go lead into outdoors and nature

NJ 4th in peaches; don't miss out on peach season!

Water, water everywhere - keep it safe to drink!

Growing beer in the Garden State

Celebrate NJ's Revolutionary War parks and open spaces on July 4

Override Governor's veto of open space bill

Taming the wild blueberry 100 years ago

Celebrate and take action during National Pollinator Week

Get on the Circuit for National Trails Day

New tax deduction would give boost to NJ non-profits

Best nature movies

ARCHIVE

April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011

CLICK FOR RECENT POSTS


     coupon           photos     
WITH THIS COUPON
Simply by being a Community Alive Member, you automatically receive a 20% partnership discount on Princeton Review SAT and ACT courses. Colleges accept both tests equally, so the choice is up to you! Enter promo code 20Communities and instantly receive your discount today! For more info, go to: http://www.princetonreview.com/partner/doylestown-alive-community#!Test-ACT
The Princeton Review
3451 Chestnut St.
Philadelphia, PA 19104
267-298-3040
http://www.princetonreview.com/partner/doylestown-alive-community
Coupons may not be combined.
Not valid with other offers or prior purchases.
Printed online at DoylestownAlive.com.

-Print Coupon

©2017 BucksCountyAlive.com. All rights reserved.
Redistribution of coupons in printed or electronic form is prohibited.

     coupon     
WITH THIS COUPON
One free hour of cleaning with the minimum purchase of a three man-hour visit
Sweeping Beauty Housecleaning
781 Philadelphia Avenue
Warrington, PA 18976
215-343-5773
http://www.sweepingbeautyhousecleaning.com/
Printed online at DoylestownAlive.com.

-Print Coupon

©2017 BucksCountyAlive.com. All rights reserved.
Redistribution of coupons in printed or electronic form is prohibited.

     coupon           photos           videos     
WITH THIS COUPON
GYMGUYZ Greater Bucks Grand Opening Coupon - 20% more sessions for next 32 bookings. Call to schedule a free in home assessment today!
GYMGUYZ Greater Bucks
Serving Bucks County, PA
215-630-8747
http://www.gymguyz.com/locations/greater-bucks-pa/
Printed online at DoylestownAlive.com.

-Print Coupon

©2017 BucksCountyAlive.com. All rights reserved.
Redistribution of coupons in printed or electronic form is prohibited.